Portfolio magazine makes me hungry, temporarily forget how fat I am

The cover of February’s Portfolio magazine has an enormous, disgusting and incredibly tasty looking burger covering almost the entire cover. The cover story (‘How Fat Won’) is a really interesting piece on american fast food and the attitude of the fast food manufacturers toward the consumer. I love that the cover story used more shots of the burger, the burger ingredients and fries and grease stains as a drop cap! And I’m worried at how much I want to taste that burger.
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Moving back to the front of the book, there are 4 contents pages. There’s nice use of white space, compelling photography, clear labeling and easy to read fonts. The first three pages are used for features, columns and some other sections labelled ‘Culture Inc.’ and ‘In Play’. The fourth is a website contents page, whose layout is significantly different from the first three, which makes me wonder what is the benefit of making this page look so different from the print content pages? Is it so the reader doesn’t immediately assume that they are reading a fourth page of print content? Or is it because they don’t promote as much of the site’s content because it’s going to update and change so much throughout the print mag’s month-long shelf-life?
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Also, the contributor’s section is placed between two left and right hand half-page vertical ads… and are given a very generous amount of space considering how little actual information there is there. But definitely a unique idea for this type of page.
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There are a lot of infographics in here (yes, I’d include the Britney Spears double-spread as an infographic – it’s just text-driven and relies on photography instead of vector-graphics), and they don’t seem to have one particular style they’ve settled on, unlike other Condé Naste publications such as Traveler. But that doesn’t take away from the look of the magazine in the slightest, in fact it seems to add a fun, lighter feeling as you flick through, and makes you stop more than once to find out what you’re looking at. Unfortunately there are a couple of occassions where an advertisement on the opposite page to a graphically driven layout or infographic is very similar in use of white space or floating elements and completely detracts from what would otherwise have been a very interesting page (see the ‘Calendar’ page below as an example, or the ‘Back Story’ page). I face similar problems with every issue of our magazine as we don’t place the ads here in-house and frequently don’t know what the ads look like until we see bluelines. We’re working on changing this slowly, but the big fight isn’t going to be changing our process, it’s going to be convincing the advertisers to change the way their ads look.
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Explore posts in the same categories: contents pages, Covers, design, Food, Infographics, Magazines, Photography, Production, Why is it like this?

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One Comment on “Portfolio magazine makes me hungry, temporarily forget how fat I am”


  1. […] Vanity Fair for C-levelers. And I’m not the only one smitten with its design. Take a look here at Magazine Love’s photo essay on the […]


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